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Want to Remove a Wine Label?


June 18, 2012 Blog » Wine Tips & Tricks » Want to Remove a Wine Label?

In the video below you’ll learn how to easily remove labels from wine bottles. All you need is an oven, a knife, and something to attach the label to once it’s removed.


Steps to Remove a Wine Label

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees.
  2. Put (empty) wine bottle in oven for 15 minutes.
  3. Remove wine label. (it should easily peel off)
  4. Stick wine label to something else.
  5. Do a celebratory dance. (every good list has 5 items, right?)

 

Why remove a wine label?

You may be wondering why you’d want to remove a wine label. Some people collect prestigious wine labels like little trophies. Others keep scrapbooks of their favorite wines. Or perhaps you want to re-use the wine bottle and don’t want any labels on it. When I was going for my Sommelier certification, I’d use wine labels like flash cards by gluing them to pieces of stock paper and writing notes on the back about the region and producer.

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Hi, I’m going to show you how I like to remove wine labels. I might be a little obsessed about bottle labels. They are like little keepsakes of a memory of a time that I had when I got to drink that wine. This method works on most wines that I’ve found. All you need is a knife, an oven, something to stick your wine label on, and the bottle from which you want to remove the label. Turn your oven to 200 degrees, put the bottle in there and wait 15 minutes. Now we wait. (Oven method doesn’t work on some European bottles.) It’s been 15 minutes, let’s get the wine bottle out of the oven. Alright, now we remove the label. Look at how easily that is coming off. Oh my god, it’s so satisfying. Oh, pull that label off. Alright, now we have our label. Woohoo!

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By Madeline Puckette
I'm a certified wine geek with a passion for meeting people, travel, and delicious food. You often find me crawling around dank cellars or frolicking through vineyards.