Vidal

A French hybrid grape, known principally for its use in ice wine making in Canada. The vines are ideal for ice wine, as they are incredibly hardy and suited to harsh winters.

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Viognier

A rich, oily white wine that originated in the Northern Rhône and is rapidly growing in popularity in California, Australia, and beyond. Wines are often age in oak to deliver Chardonnay-like richness.

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Valpolicella

The region’s most famous wine, Amarone della Valpolicella, partially dries grapes to increase concentration in a process called appasimento. Corvina is the darling grape of the Valpo blend and known for its flavors of cherries and chocolate.

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Savatiano

Greece’s most planted variety is starting to make a comeback as more winemakers focus on quality producing richer, full-bodied white wines reminiscent of Chardonnay.

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Sémillon

An important white grape of Bordeaux, including the prized dessert wine, Sauternes. Wines can be surprisingly rich and when oaked, can taste similar to Chardonnay.

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St. Laurent

Likely originating in Austria, this small berried vine yields cherry flavoured wines that have been compared to a deeper coloured, beefier version of Pinot Noir.

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Touriga Franca

A northern Portuguese native, used mainly in Port wine production, as well as blended table wines of the Dão. Wines are deep in colour, with floral, red-fruit flavours.

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Tokaji Aszú

A notable Hungarian sweet wine made mostly of Furmint grapes that are affected by a special rot called Botrytis cinerea. The rot concentrates the grape’s sugars and adds distinct aromas of ginger and saffron.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the world’s most popular light-bodied red wine. It’s loved for its red fruit, flower, and spice aromas that are accentuated by a long, smooth finish.

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Roussanne

An intriguing, rare full-bodied white found mostly in Southern France where it’s blended into white blends with Grenache Blanc, Marsanne and sometimes Viognier.

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