Xinomavro

The most important grape of Naoussa, Greece where wine enthusiasts often cite the Xinomavro’s similarities to the Nebbiolo grape and the collector-worthy wine’s of Barolo.

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Zweigelt

Austria’s most planted red wine grape and is a cross between Blaufränkisch and St. Laurent (tastes like Pinot Noir). Resulting wines are bright, tart, and fruity.

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Valpolicella

The region’s most famous wine, Amarone della Valpolicella, partially dries grapes to increase concentration in a process called appasimento. Corvina is the darling grape of the Valpo blend and known for its flavors of cherries and chocolate.

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Vin Santo

Vin Santo or “holy wine” is a rare dessert wine found mostly in Tuscany. The grapes are first dried on straw mats to concentrate the sugars and can take as long as 4 years to ferment.

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Vinsanto

Confusingly, not Italy’s Vin Santo, Vinsanto is a Greek sweet wine made in a passito style (sun-dried grapes) and known mostly from Santorini where it’s made with Assyrtiko.

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St. Laurent

Likely originating in Austria, this small berried vine yields cherry flavoured wines that have been compared to a deeper coloured, beefier version of Pinot Noir.

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Sherry

The top fortified wine of Spain made primarily with Palomino grapes and extended oxidative aging. It’s available in a range of styles of bone dry to very sweet.

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Schiava

A group of several varieties, the finest of which is called Schiava Gentile. Wines are sweetly aromatic and light-bodied with aromas reminiscent to cotton candy and roses.

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Pinot Noir

Pinot Noir is the world’s most popular light-bodied red wine. It’s loved for its red fruit, flower, and spice aromas that are accentuated by a long, smooth finish.

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Port

Portugal’s flagship; an aged, sweet fortified wine that comes in a wide range of styles, largely based on ageing techniques. Commonly seen styles include Ruby and Tawny.

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