Wine Folly Logo
Deep Dive

Featured Wine: Nebbiolo

- Updated

The most popular Nebbiolo-based wines, Barolo and Barbaresco, are quite expensive. Luckily, you can get your cherry, tar, and rose-fix from a few other regions where there are more pocketbook-friendly options. The neighboring regions such as Roero, Gattinara, Ghemme, Nebbiolo d’Alba and Langhe in Piedmont, as well as Valtellina in Lombardy, are made with 70-100% Nebbiolo and offer similar (if not strikingly similar – Roero) flavor profiles to Barolo, with a little lighter tannin and price.

nebbiolo-tasting-profile-wine-folly

Drink some other Nebbiolo-based wines.

For the most value-friendly option, a Langhe Nebbiolo is a great way to get started. 2015 was a good vintage, and these wines are on the market now. If you didn’t already know, Barolo and Barbaresco are actually grown within the Langhe hills of Piedmont, and some of the Langhe Nebbiolo are made from declassified vineyards. Upon first sip, these wines are substantially lighter on the palate, but from a good vintage, they exhibit the same sexy aromas of cherries, roses, and subtle hints of leather.

For those looking for baby-Barolo, look no further than Roero Riserva DOCG, which requires a minimum of 32 months of aging, including 6 months in barrel. The 2010 and 2011 vintages are excellent places to start.

For those who love Amarone, in the region of Valtellina, there’s a Nebbiolo wine made in a transverse valley that opens up to Lake Como. It’s make with the same grape-drying technique as Amarone della Valpolicella. Sfursat (aka Sfurzato) is usually delicately colored, but rich in texture and red-fruit flavors.

Here is a lot more detail on Nebbiolo if your palate has been piqued.

Buy the Book - Get the Course!

Get the Wine 101 Course ($29 value) FREE with the purchase of Wine Folly: Magnum Edition.

Learn More

AboutKanchan Schindlauer

I'm a certified wine geek, constantly discovering new facets in the joy of wine. And to think, it was under my nose this whole time!

Cover Image for Spicy Red Wine Quick Guide

Spicy Red Wine Quick Guide

Spicy red wine – Syrah, Chianti, and Californian Zinfandel. Learn more now about your palate and how to choose bold spicy red wine.

Read More
Cover Image for Wine Folly’s Handy Champagne Guide

Wine Folly’s Handy Champagne Guide

There’s a lot to consider when opening a bottle of Champagne for your celeberation. We’ve got you covered with our Handy Champagne Guide.

Read More
Cover Image for New Zealand Chardonnay – Jewel of the South Pacific

New Zealand Chardonnay – Jewel of the South Pacific

Dive into New Zealand’s Chardonnay – your next favorite wine is waiting to be discovered in a small land with passionate wine makers.

Read More
Cover Image for 8 Dark Horse Red Wines from Southern Italy

8 Dark Horse Red Wines from Southern Italy

Get excited for a dark horse Italian wine. These 8 wines from Southern Italy aren’t well-known, but you just might crown them a winner.

Read More
Cover Image for AOC Wine: Decoding French Wine Classifications

AOC Wine: Decoding French Wine Classifications

When it comes to AOC wine and French classifications, it can feel really complicated really fast. But if you know some basics, you’ll find that understanding comes pretty easily.

Read More
Cover Image for Light Strike: Why Wine and Sunlight Don’t Mix

Light Strike: Why Wine and Sunlight Don’t Mix

Unless you want its fruity and floral aromas to become those of cooked cabbage, wet cardboard and wet dog, make sure your wine and sunlight stay far away from each other. Keep reading for more on this and what else you can do to protect your wine.

Read More