Vinsanto

Confusingly, not Italy’s Vin Santo, Vinsanto is a Greek sweet wine made in a passito style (sun-dried grapes) and known mostly from Santorini where it’s made with Assyrtiko.

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Viura

The most important white grape of Rioja where wines evolve over 10 or more years. In Catalonia, Viura is called Macabeo and is the primary blending grape in Cava sparkling wines.

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Sémillon

An important white grape of Bordeaux, including the prized dessert wine, Sauternes. Wines can be surprisingly rich and when oaked, can taste similar to Chardonnay.

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Syrah

A rich, powerful, and sometimes meaty red wine that originated in the Rhône Valley of France. Syrah is the most planted grape of Australia where they call it Shiraz.

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Tannat

Tannat is the most planted variety of Uruguay where it was studied to determine that it contains some of the highest polyphenols (antioxidants) of all red wines.

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Torrontés

Argentina’s very own white is actually a group of 3 varieties that are offspring of Muscat of Alexandria. Of the 3 varieties Torrontés Riojano is considered the best.

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Provence (Rosé)

Rosé was once only thought of as fruity and cloying; these dry and mineral driven pink wines (that contain a plethora of grapes) have proven that rosé can be serious. Seriously delicious.

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Rhône / GSM Blend

GSM stands for Grenache, Syrah, and Mourvèdre – three important grapes grown in the Côtes du Rhône region of France. Today, this blend is produced throughout the world and is loved for its complex red fruit flavors and age-worthy potential.

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Petite Sirah

Petit Sirah is loved for its deeply colored wines with rich black fruit flavors and bold tannins. The grape related to Syrah and the rare French grape, Peloursin. The French call it “Durif” but this wine is rare outside of California.

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Pinot Blanc

Pinot Blanc is the white grape mutation of Pinot Noir. It’s found mostly in Germany and Northern Italy where wines are refreshing, peachy, and dry.

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