Viognier

A rich, oily white wine that originated in the Northern Rhône and is rapidly growing in popularity in California, Australia, and beyond. Wines are often age in oak to deliver Chardonnay-like richness.

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Zinfandel (Primitivo)

A fruit-forward-yet-bold red that’s loved for its red fruit flavors and smoky exotic spice notes. Originally from Croatia and related to top Croatian grape, Plavic Mali.

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Savatiano

Greece’s most planted variety is starting to make a comeback as more winemakers focus on quality producing richer, full-bodied white wines reminiscent of Chardonnay.

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Rhône Blend (White)

The rare white wines of the Rhône Valley offer a terrific alternative for Chardonnay lovers. Wines are typically a blend of Marsanne and Roussanne with a little Viognier and Grenache Blanc thrown in.

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País

The Chilean name for the Spanish grape, Listán Prieto. It’s been used mostly for bulk rosé until recently, where quality-minded, natural winemakers are launching tart, high-tannin reds made from País old vines.

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Pedro Ximénez

The Andalucían grapes responsible for some of the world’s sweetest fortified wines are often dried in the sun to further concentrate the sugars. PX sherry on your pancakes, anyone?

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Grenache Blanc

Grenache Blanc is a color mutation of Grenache producing full-bodied white wines that are sometimes aged in oak to delivery toasty, creamy, dill-like flavors.

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Malbec

Argentina’s most important variety came by way of France, where it’s commonly called Côt (sounds like “coat”). Wines are loved for their rich, dark fruit flavors and smooth chocolatey finish.

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Malvasia Fina

Malvasia Fina, or Boal, as it is known on the island of Madeira is one of the four main grapes used in Madeira production. In table wines, full aromatics and alcohol are of note.

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Marsanne

A primary blending grape in white Rhône blends that also include Roussanne, Grenache Blanc and sometimes Viognier. A great alternative to Chardonnay.

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