Pinot Gris

Pinot Gris (aka Pinot Grigio) is a pinkish grape mutation of Pinot Noir. It’s famously known for zesty white wines, but can also be used for rosé. Look to Northern Italy, Oregon, and Alsace for benchmark examples.

Read more

Priorat

A Spanish regional wine blend known largely for its full, dusty red wines made primarily from Grenache and Carignan. The best age a minimum of five years before release and some include Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon for additional complexity.

Read more

Pinot Blanc

Pinot Blanc is the white grape mutation of Pinot Noir. It’s found mostly in Germany and Northern Italy where wines are refreshing, peachy, and dry.

Read more

Nerello Mascalese

A rare red Sicilian grape producing fine light to medium-bodied red wines reminiscent of Pinot Noir. The best examples are found growing on the volcanic soils of Mount Etna.

Read more

Grüner Veltliner

Austria’s most important wine is produced in a myriad of styles, the most popular of which are lean, herbaceous, and peppery wines with mouth-watering acidity.

Read more

Mencía

A red variety from the Iberian peninsula (Spain and Portugal) that’s quickly developing a following. It’s loved for its heady aromatics and potential to age.

Read more

Godello

A rare grape with great potential from the Iberian peninsula delivers mouth-watering flavors of briny grapefruit. The best examples offer smoky minerality.

Read more

Friulano

Officially called Sauvignonasse, this lean, dry, herbal white is often mistaken for Sauvignon Blanc. You’ll find it in abundance in Northeastern Italy in Friuli-Venezia Giulia.

Read more

Cabernet Franc

Cabernet Franc is the parent grape of both Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. Complex reds result, with aromas of raspberry, bramble, and bell pepper (pyrazines).

Read more