Vin Santo

Vin Santo or “holy wine” is a rare dessert wine found mostly in Tuscany. The grapes are first dried on straw mats to concentrate the sugars and can take as long as 4 years to ferment.

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Vinsanto

Confusingly, not Italy’s Vin Santo, Vinsanto is a Greek sweet wine made in a passito style (sun-dried grapes) and known mostly from Santorini where it’s made with Assyrtiko.

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Vin Jaune

A rare, oxidized French white with bizarrely unique aromas. Occassionally, you’ll find it used in cooking where it adds an indescrible nutty taste to classic French dishes.

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Sauternais

A group of rare dessert wines from Bordeaux made with Sémillon, Sauvignon Blanc, and Muscadelle grapes infected with a special kind of rot called Botrytis cinerea that concentrates the grape sugars.

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Sherry

The top fortified wine of Spain made primarily with Palomino grapes and extended oxidative aging. It’s available in a range of styles of bone dry to very sweet.

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Tokaji Aszú

A notable Hungarian sweet wine made mostly of Furmint grapes that are affected by a special rot called Botrytis cinerea. The rot concentrates the grape’s sugars and adds distinct aromas of ginger and saffron.

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Port

Portugal’s flagship; an aged, sweet fortified wine that comes in a wide range of styles, largely based on ageing techniques. Commonly seen styles include Ruby and Tawny.

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Port (White)

The most important fortified sweet wine of Portugal is made in a range of styles including white, rosé, red and tawny, each with a unique taste profile.

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Muscat of Alexandria

Another important Muscat variety used primarily for dessert wines that delivers slightly more mandarin orange, orange zest and sweet rose notes than Muscat Blanc.

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Pedro Ximénez

The Andalucían grapes responsible for some of the world’s sweetest fortified wines are often dried in the sun to further concentrate the sugars. PX sherry on your pancakes, anyone?

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